Jun 152019
 
how to install a garden fountain top tips

Another great day in the garden. I’m finally ready to dig the borders. But first, today, I share my expertise with you on the subject of garden fountains and How to install a garden fountain – Top Tips. Read on for more, or if you are just looking to buy plants, garden tables and chairs, or check prices and features then click here to compare prices.

A great way to spice up your garden is to add a water feature. These can
be both soothing and aesthetically appealing. I’ve found that there’s
nothing more relaxing than sitting on a bench next to my garden and
listening to my fountain while I read a good book or do some studying.
Putting in a water feature is fairly easy and relatively inexpensive, and
will add immensely to the pleasantness of your garden. Also, the
maintenance level is minimal.

Usually, people install fountains for the benefit of the natural ambience
it provides. For some reason, being around a gorgeous scene of water gives
you a positive energy. This is also good if you practice Tai Chi or some
form of yoga or meditation. The constant drone of the water is exactly
what most people need to concentrate on what they are doing. Even if
you’re not into that kind of stuff, just being in a garden with a fountain
has a sort of meditative quality to it, even if you’re not trying to do
so. I recommend it to anyone.

When you first decide to put in a fountain, you need to put great care
into picking out one that will go well with the rest of your garden. If
you have any other decorations, you want to consider if it goes well with
your motif. Does the fountain you’re considering stand out in your garden
like a sore thumb, or does it look like it was meant to be there? If
you’re like me, you can’t naturally tell whether the fountain will be a
good addition to your garden just by looking at it. So my solution was to
bring my sister (a natural at fashion design and that kind of stuff) along
with a picture of my garden to the store. I was able to get her expert
opinion, as well as see for myself what it would look like. By doing this
I was able to pick a beautiful rock fountain that goes marvellously with
the rest of my garden.

However, I still had a slight problem with supplying my fountain with
power. You see, my garden isn’t very close to my house. I thought it would
look pretty tacky to run an extension cord across my yard, so I had to
come up with another solution. I discussed my situation with a Home Depot
employee, and he quickly found me the exact solution I needed: an
extension cord meant for being buried! All it took was a few hours of
digging a small trench across my yard, and I had power to my fountain
without an unsightly cord running across my yard. After I got over this
little hitch, my fountain plan went beautifully.

So if you’re looking for a way to make your garden a more classy and
beautiful place to be, I hope you consider installing a fountain. The
whole process is surprisingly inexpensive, and I think that you will be
very happy with the results. Having a fountain in your garden is not only
soothing, but it also adds a lot of character to an otherwise bland
garden. Remember, gardens are not just for giving us vegetables! A garden
is a place to go when you want to retreat from the outside world and dwell
in your own thoughts with no disturbance.

Jun 122019
 
using pesticide how to apply it effectively and safely

My goal with my gardening blog is to bring you expert information on everything from when to plant to gardening gifts. Please leave me a comment on the gardening article below and I’ll reply as soon as I can. Using pesticide – How to apply it effectively and safely.

If you want to protect your fruit tree from pests during the summer, this is almost impossible to accomplish without the use of pesticides or chemicals. This might scare some people into thinking that the actual fruits will contain traces of the chemicals. If you do things correctly, you can get rid of all the pests and not infect the actual tree. If you’re going to be spraying chemicals, you most likely will be using either a handheld pump or a hose-end sprayer.

If you’re using the pump sprayers, you will be able to more accurately determine the mixing of the chemicals. Unfortunately, you won’t be able to spray it very far. Usually it won’t reach the tops of trees. This can be achieved with the hose end sprayers, but getting the correct mix of chemicals is quite a challenge. It all depends on your water pressure to get the correct mixture of chemicals, but water pressure is not constant. One day it might be lower, in which case your chemical content would be higher. The types of materials you buy for hose application are generally in an extremely strong form. They need to be severely diluted before they are weak enough to apply.

When you are mixing the chemicals for spraying, you need to follow the directions exactly. You are dealing with dangerous chemicals, so its best to do exactly what the professionals recommend and wear the proper protective gear. When you’re dealing with chemicals like this, you should always wear rubber gloves. Use the exact portions indicated on the label. Estimation won’t work in this case, and you could end up killing your tree or not killing any bugs. You should usually start by putting in the proper amount of pesticide, and then top it off with all the water.

Now comes the spraying. The goal is to spray the same amount over all the areas. You still don’t want to spray so much that enough builds up to drip off of the leaves. Usually you will want to get a ladder so that you can get within spraying distance of all the portions of the tree. Apply the pesticide in even, full sweeps as to hit every piece. Never go over the same part twice, because that is when you start to drip.

If you’re dealing with a large and well developed tree, you should stand on a ladder under the base of the trunk. Spray all segments from the inside towards the outside. After you are done spraying the outer canopy, you’re ready to get out from under there and work on the rest. Once you are done cleaning, be sure to fully and thoroughly clean off every bit of equipment you used, including your clothes. Don’t include the clothes you wore while spraying in the rest of your family’s laundry.

While you’re spraying for pests, the main thing to keep in mind is to avoid dripping onto the ground. When this happens, the pesticides will be absorbed by the roots of the tree and be transported to the actual fruits on the trees. As long as the pesticides stay on the outside and you wash your fruit thoroughly before you eat it, you will have nothing to worry about as far as being poisoned goes.

Come back soon for more on pumps, weedkiller and pesticide. Please join the mailing list to stay informed of updates. Using pesticide – How to apply it effectively and safely

Jun 092019
 
trees no longer producing fruit how to cure them

With the current weather its even more important to look after the garden. Todays garden tips article revolves around trees that have become barren. Please remember to leave a comment if you have any thoughts or questions on trees that have become barren or on gardening tips.

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One of the most frustrating things that can possibly happen to someone who has slaved for hours and hours in growing a fruit tree is the unexplainable barrenness that can sometimes occur when there should be a plethora of fresh fruit. I know this from experience. My neighbours all consider me the gardening guru because of my extensive knowledge. But this is only because gardening has been my passion for years and years, and like a sponge I have accumulated so much information in my mind. My learning has also come from past experiences with failure. For about 5 years after I started planting fruit trees, I did not see a single fruit for all my labour. I was nearly ready to give up, until I met who I think is truly the guru of gardening.

I was in the gardening store, looking for some sort of new fertilizer to put my hope in for my quest to obtain fruit. I don’t know if there was a look of desperation in my eyes, but a kindly old man came up and started speaking with me. He introduced himself as Ralph, and for some reason I opened up to him and told him about all of my difficulties. I’ve never been the type to spill all my problems on anyone who asks, but Ralph seemed like such a nice fellow that I just couldn’t help it. And I’m glad I did, because what he taught me truly helped me to get my fruit trees in gear and start producing.

I learned that generally, the inability to produce can be caused by a number of factors. Sometimes the tree is simply too young; If your tree is less than four years old, you shouldn’t exactly expect it to be producing yet. If it has reached 4 years and you still have seen no sign of fruit, then you should start to consider other factors that might be causing the barrenness.

If the tree is undergoing any type of water stress (this can be poor drainage, too much water, or too little water), then it will have trouble growing. If you suspect this is the case, you should evaluate your own watering techniques and compare them with the needs of the tree to see if you are causing water stress. Also always be on the lookout for any diseases or pest damages. If your tree is constantly being molested by all kinds of little creatures, then you can’t expect it to be lively enough to produce fruit.

If your tree blooms but still doesn’t produce any fruit, this could be because of cold temperatures during the bloom. The coldness damaged the flower bud or damaged the baby fruit. Aesthetically the tree may look fine, but the inside could be damaged beyond any hope of ever seeing fruit. Unfortunately there isn’t much you can do in this case except for wait until next year and hope that it doesn’t happen again.

If the tree’s pollination process has not been fully completed, it could have troubles growing fruit. If you planted different varieties, you may find that the requirements are different than you had originally thought and they were incompatible. In this case you need to replant the correct combinations.

Once I evaluated the conditions of my tree and everything that has occurred in its life, I realized that not only had I cross pollinated slightly incorrectly, but I was also giving my tree too much water. After I fixed these problems, I had learned my lesson and I have not had any trouble bearing fruit since then.

So if you are struggling with a plant that is not being cooperative, you should consult an expert gardener. If you can find a gardening mentor like mine that is willing to teach you everything they know, then you should be able to get your garden on the right track with no problems.

Come back soon for more on fruit trees, fruit and trees that have become barren. Please join the mailing list to stay informed of updates. Trees no longer producing fruit – How to cure them

Jun 062019
 
when to plant peas how to grow garden peas

When to Plant Peas.  First of all you need to dig your pea patch as early as the ground can be worked in the spring. When turning the soil, you need to work in generous amounts of organic material such as rotted manure, compost, leaf mold or old hay. For dwarf peas, you dig a flat-bottomed furrow only about 2 inches deep, and 3-4 inches wide. For the tall varieties, which will need a trellis of some sort for support, you need to make the furrow 10 inches wide, set the support in the center, and plant a row of peas on each side. You can also grow tall peas to go up a fence. If you don’t want to bother with a trellis, you can try planting a double row of peas, these will support each other as the vines grow. This method will work best only with moderately tall plants that grow to only about 18 inches. The high climbing peas, 2 1/2 – 3 feet tall, will need extra support.

Your trellis, if you use one, should be set up before planting. Almost any type of support will work: chicken wire, a lightweight plastic mesh purchased from a garden center, or you can set up rows of string expanding between two posts. A rough trellis can be made from several tall, twiggy branches that are staked close together for the entire length of the row.

So when to plant peas for maximum growth?  And how should you grow garden peas.  Just before planting your seeds, cover the bottom of the trench with a low-nitrogen fertilizer, about 2 ounces for every 10 feet of row, mixed with the soil. A good idea before sowing, dust the pea seeds with a soil inoculant, which is a nitrogen-fixing bacterial culture that will increase the plants’ ability to add nitrogen to the soil. You can purchase this product on-line or at a garden center.

Sow the pea seeds an inch apart and 2 inches deep. In preventing the birds from eating the seeds, you want to cover the rows with plastic netting or use a mesh of string until the peas have sprouted. When the seedlings reach approximately 3 inches high, you want to mound some soil around the stems for support. As plants start growing taller, hook their climbing tendrils around the support you provided.

Peas need quite a bit of moisture, and mulching the rows is an excellent way to both retain moisture and hold down the weeds. Check the soil occasionally to make sure it isn’t dry, if so, water when necessary. Because peas are vulnerable to fungous disease, only water the plants at the soil level, this way the leaves won’t get wet.

When the plants reach 6-8 inches in height, spread a bit of 5-10-10 fertilizer on both sides of each row, approximately 5 ounces per 10 feet of row. In order to avoid fertilizer burn, try not to spill fertilizer granules on the leaves.

If the vines should start to trail away from their support, you can tie them against it with long, narrow strips of cloth or a few pieces of soft twine. Peas taste best if you pick them while they are young and tender. Tough specimens are caused by leaving them on the vine one or two days too long.  When to Plant Peas.  If you harvest on a regular basis, you will pick the peas when they are just at their prime. Check the lowest pods first and often, because they mature first. Also if mature pods are left on the vine they serve as a sort of signal to the plant to halt production.

Garden peas should be picked when the pods are well filled, but the peas are not yet hard. Edible-pod peas are ready for eating when the pods just begin to swell. If you wait until the pea shapes start showing through the pod, the pods will be much too tough to eat. If snow peas are left too long on the vine, you can still shell and cook them as you do green peas.

Peas must be harvested with care, hold the vine with one hand and pick the pod off with other. Otherwise you run the risk of removing part of the plant.

Remember, peas are heavy feeders and whatever they take out of the soil must be replaced, particularly if you are planning a succession crop in your existing pea patch. When the harvest is over, you can pull up the plants and put them in the compost pile if you have one; or you can dig them directly into the soil. Fertilizing the soil and adding more compost is a must if you are planting another crop in the pea patch.

If there is a large amount of peas on the vine, near the end of harvesting season, you may want to dry those that you cannot use right away.To do so, just leave the pods on the vine until the peas are hard. Then you can pick, shell and dry them in the oven on low for half an hour. Afterwards store them in jars. If keeping them over winter, place jars in a dry place to prevent mold from forming.

Jun 032019
 
small fruit how to fix undersized fruit on your fruit trees

Another great day in the garden. I’m finally ready to dig the borders. But first, today, I share my expertise with you on the subject of small fruit and Small fruit – How to fix undersized fruit on your fruit trees. Read on for more, or if you are just looking to buy plants, garden tables and chairs, or check prices and features then click here to compare prices.

The one thing that usually shocks new tree growers is the fact that the fruits produced by their tree are much smaller than the ones they’re used to seeing at the local shop. “What is wrong with my tree?!”, “My God! What have I done!?” are some cried you may hear from the disgruntled tree grower. However, small fruits are a natural occurrence. But while smaller fruits might be what nature originally intended, it is possible to attain larger fruits without any genetic altering or added chemicals. It is only through advanced techniques that the professionals reach such large sizes with their fruits.

Usually in the early stages of a fruit trees growing, veterans do something called “fruit thinning”. The theory behind this process is that with less fruits to pay attention to, the tree will be able to more efficiently send cells to the leftover fruits. When there are hundreds of little fruits on one tree, competing for the available materials necessary for growth, you will most likely just end up with a bunch of stunted fruits. To take care of this problem, simply pluck a third of the fruits extremely early on in the process. You should notice larger fruits that season.

On almost any tree, the success of each individual fruit depends on the spacing. Usually there should not be any fruits within six to eight inches of each other. During the fruit thinning process, this is the distance you should generally aim for to optimize the amount of nutrition that each fruit gets. Any closer and you’ll find they are crowding each other out. Usually this is the first mistake that a new tree grower makes. Having tons of fruit starting to grow is not always a good thing!

Sometimes small fruits are caused by conditions out of the gardener’s control. During the process of cell division that all new fruits go through, cool weather can be fatal to the largeness of your fruits. Likewise, if the weather is particularly cloudy very early in the season, then fewer carbohydrates will be available to your plants. Occasionally, if the factors are all against the well being of your fruit tree, then the fruits will drop to the ground before they are even ripe. A lack of water or certain nutrients, or excessive pests and diseases can also damage the growth of fruits. If you notice these things going on early in the season, you should do more fruit thinning than normal. Sometimes as much as three fourths of the fruits should come off, to allow full nutrition to those who remain.

The best way to find out how to gain larger fruit sizes is to experiment. If your tree has been around for a while, there is almost nothing you can do to it to cause it to die or stop producing fruit. Just test different thinning techniques or anything you can think of to make the fruits larger. You might even head down to your local nursery and enquire about what they would suggest. They will be able to give you advice based on your region and specific tree, which is better than anything I could tell you. So don’t settle with small fruits. Go out there and find out what exactly you need to do to improve the size.

That’s all I have time for today. Hopefully its useful in learning a little more on small fruit. If you are interested in finding out more on problems growing fruit trees, blight etc sign up to our mailing list. If would like to buy then click to today I’ve found a fantastic special offer on water features.